graphicpush

Thoughts on branding, design, writing and life by Kevin Potts. Established 2003.

Adobe Discontinues PageMaker

Adobe announced they are officially disbanding PageMaker from their line-up. This should come as no real surprise to the design community, since PageMaker’s key stand-out features were introduced into InDesign CS a few months ago.

Adobe announced they are officially disbanding PageMaker from their line-up, and wrapping up the remains into a new product called “Adobe InDesign CS PageMaker Edition,” (or IDCSPME, as I refer to it from here on out) that continues their trend of not-so-clever naming conventions.

This should come as no real surprise to the design community, since PageMaker’s key stand-out features (story editor and contextual palette) were introduced into InDesign CS a few months ago. However, the few remaining features have now been assimilated into IDCSPME. (This also squashes any chance of PageMaker for OSX.)

This product is being offered as an upgrade to existing PM users for $350, which is a great price considering the massive functionality that IDCS offers. And the product is comprehensive in compatibility—InDesign 2, Quark 3.3 and 4.x, plus PageMaker 6.x through 7.x files. If they could figure out how to import Publisher files, life would truly be grand.

After the recent termination of LiveMotion, PageMaker is the latest chunk of fat to be cut from the Adobe mothership. With the introduction of the CS line, the company is making a concerted effort to condense and integrate, which only means good things down the road for the designer as inconsistencies and incompatibilities are ironed out of the products. Also, by eliminating another player from the print layout arena, it can now set its big InDesign marketing guns square on the entrenched Quark.

I anticipate the next version of InDesign (CS2, CS2005, CS OMFG, CS Special Gold Kill Quark Forever Edition) to fully envelope all the remaining PageMaker features. Since IDCSPME is basically a glorified plug-in pack, there seems little chance of upgrading it; it’s more of a one-off patch to suck PM users into InDesign (and, incidentally, OSX). But PM gurus are like Quark gurus—they like what they know and know what they like, so Adobe’s quest for page layout supremacy will remain an uphill battle for years to come.