graphicpush

Thoughts on branding, design, writing and life by Kevin Potts. Established 2003.

Adobe Implements Anti-Counterfeit Technology

No, the new Photoshop will not open images of currency, but there’s so many ways around the protection that one wonders why they bothered in the first place.

What started as a small post on Adobe’s support forum quickly blew into a media frenzy as Adobe’s new anti-counterfeiting technology came to light. In essence, the new software will not open images of currency, instead bringing up an error screen and directing the user to a government site.

For the shocked and offended users out there, it was only a matter of time. Color-proofing printers, high resolution scanners and a wealth of paper choices have inevitably led to the rise of digital counterfeiting, which the government claims makes up for 40% of all funny money.

But there’s so many ways around the protection that one wonders why they bothered in the first place. Photoshop 7 still opens money pics normally, after all. My guess is they will retain this protection in all future versions, and slowly enhance it to combat workarounds like stitching together segments and converting to legacy formats. No one seriously expects PSCS to slow digital counterfeiting, but maybe Photoshop 10 (or CS version 3) will, because by then Photoshop 7 will be as rare as Photoshop 2.5 is today, and the software’s recognition will have matured exponentially.

Yeah, everyone can cry “censorship” or “Big Brother” or “government controlled lifestyle” all they want, but this is just a natural extension of an over-protective society and a heavy-handed government. A few bad eggs will ruin the farm for everyone.

(As for the conspiracy buffs, I highly doubt Adobe’s secret software addition is spying on your computer. The government really doesn’t care what Britney Spears fan sites you’re visiting, or how you “accidentally” downloaded that Outkast song.)