graphicpush

Thoughts on branding, design, writing and life by Kevin Potts. Established 2003.

The Monday Linkies

Well, here you go. A completely lazy post. I’ve got some good stuff coming, but I thought I would at least touch base with a few interesting things that have crossed my desk.

Well, here you go. A completely lazy post. I’ve got some good stuff coming, but I thought I would at least touch base with a few interesting things that have crossed my desk.

First, Yeti Sports has released version 5 of the penguin games. You may have played the yeti-hitting-the-penguin-like-a-baseball version, but the new one (“Africa”) is entirely too addicting. The graphics and physics keep getting better, and the sound effects are hilarious. Get you some.

kottke.org “redesigns.” A two-year effort results in a rearranged site hierarchy and a thinner header. I’m not sure if the whole pointlessly shrunken masthead trend that mezzoblue made famous is the new cool thing to do, but it’s just not working for me. Maybe “minimal, yet unreadable” is the new standard, but IMO, an eye-squinting font size buried in a sea of white space does not a good design make.

In other hipster blog news, Cederholm is selling his icons for $45. They are pretty good. (You could also get some ahem free ones to go along with his set.)

Also, in case you missed it, Microsoft might be planning to renew IE development. Won’t that be a barrel of drunk monkeys when they release IE 6.5? Oh, what weeping and gnashing of teeth from anguished designers will come with the sound of every box model hack around the world breaking at the same time.

Have a great week!

commentary + criticism

Willem

wrote the following on Thursday December 30, 2004

> the sound of every box model hack around the world breaking at the same time.

It will be off the mental Richter scale.

I, and I assume plenty coders with me, will laugh at the destruction, and boast about our sites, XHTML/CSS-compliance free of hacks.

Ten years from now, it will be a movie: The Day The Web Broke.

(This is assuming they actually fix IE, and discontinue the Quirksmode tomfoolery)

Wesley Walser

wrote the following on Thursday December 30, 2004

I am sorry, but I just started working in css and such. Why would fixing IE make the hacks break. The hacks are hidden from compliant browsers because IE doesn’t understand some things, and so the workarounds used one weakness to fix another. Therefore in the case that it is truly fixed, shouldn’t the hacks simply cancel each other so to speak?

Kevin

wrote the following on Thursday December 30, 2004

Because MS are the type of company that would break their own hacks. The next IE could very well fix the box model for good, but the hack (now irrelevant) would still work, throwing websites into a loop as the rendering engine administers the correct value and then the adjusted value on top of that.